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notes and pics of my 7MGE swap

 
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coraxOffline
Joined: 27 May 2005
Total posts: 33
Location: eastern PA
Gender: Male
PostPosted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 3:32 pm    Post subject: notes and pics of my 7MGE swap Reply with quote

Originally my rig had a 22-RE, so the information I’m giving is geared to a 22RE-7MGE swap, the 3.0 V6 is a bit different. Also, I swapped in a naturally aspirated engine, the turbo can also be bolted in but uses a different harness, AFM and ECU, plus there is intercooler plumbing to find room for. The biggest difficulty in this swap is finding room in front of the engine since it is an inline 6, but some creative trimming goes a long way. The 7MGE is built typical Toyota rock solid, but many have had problems with headgasket leakage - the problem with the headgasket was insufficient factory torque (52 ft/lbs) and is remedied by increasing the torque to 72 ft/lbs. A completely bullet-proof fix would include an MLS (multi-layer steel) headgasket and ARP head bolts or studs.

Since everyone is considering fuel economy these days, I'll also say that my 22RE before the swap got 20mpg and I recently got 19.5 mpg highway cruising 80mph with the 7MGE (15mpg on the trails in Big Bear).

I spent ~ 3 months researching this swap during down time at work and several more months searching for parts in Junkyards. This swap could also be done by buying a running Supra. The engine I got from a JDM importer for $375 off ebay (I picked it up in person to avoid shipping). Total cost for the entire project was less than $1k (can’t beat junkyard prices). The entire swap took me about 2 -3 days once I had all the parts together, however I’ve since tweaked and changed a few things here and there after driving it awhile. The biggest obstacle is fitting a large enough radiator that will still allow for an electric fan, a lesser problem is exhaust routing since it needs to cross over form the passenger side to join the rest of the exhaust on the driver side.

The majority of my research came from SupraCharged.com and the write-up that I liked best came from Andrew Hulse’s 1st gen 4runner swap.
1G 4runner swap pg 1
1G 4runner swap pg 2
1G 4runner swap pg 3

Here’s the thread 4RnrRick had when he swapped in a 7M 4RnrRick’s swap thread, though he concluded he would have been happier with a 3.4 swap


The write-ups above go through the actual install fairly well, so I’ll try to avoid repeating too much. What you’ll need to get the 7MGE bolted in:
- Supra bellhousing, clutch fork & throwout bearing retaining spring, clutch slave cylinder & hose - Supra’s used a “W” series transmission which uses the same bellhousing-trans bolt pattern as the “W” series truck trans – you will use your stock “W” series trans and transfer case – use a pre ’89 bellhousing, after this Toyota changed the clutch and pressure plate design, pre ’89 is the standard “fork and throwout” style


- 5MGE motor mount brackets – bolt on one position further back on the 7MGE block and allow you to use the stock 22RE rubber engine mounts

- 7MGE Cressida oil pan and oil pump – the Cressida used a front sump oil pan (vs Supra mid sump which interfered with the IFS front diff) which clears the front tie rod perfectly though you do need to remove the steering damper - also the Supra used a mid sump oil pan, so the dipstick needs to be relocated is using a Supra block, there is already a boss to drill through and it's no big deal using a hand held drill, just make sure you use a drill bit the same size as the dipstick tube, brace the tube to a nearby bolt and seal it up with black RTV

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coraxOffline
Joined: 27 May 2005
Total posts: 33
Location: eastern PA
Gender: Male
PostPosted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

- wire harness – I junkyarded mine for $30 and made sure to be careful pulling it out – don’t break connectors pulling them off, don’t pull on wires and when you get to the big connectors that connect the engine harness to the rest of the vehicle (behind dash) leave yourself ~1’ of wire and take both sides of the connector (male and female side – it makes wiring everything together easier)
- ECU – I was able to mount everything in the stock location down in the passenger side kick panel using the 22RE ECU brackets - it's a tight fit, but works nice if you keep wire length to manageable lengths and tuck them up and behind the ECU


- Vane Airflow Meter to match your engine (smog will want everything to be the same year or newer as your vehicle, but they really have no visual way of checking)
- igniter and ignition coil - I moved the ignition coil to the passenger side so I could use a shorter coil wire

- Injector Resistor (leave this connected to the harness when you get it at the junkyard)

- use the factory throttle cable and fab a simple cable holder –or- use the factory Supra cables, setup and linkages

- factory 22RE fuel pump works fine, no upgrade needed, fuel filter will be factory mounted to the 7MGE block on driver side – need to bend fuel lines to run gas from the passenger side to driver side

- the 7M mechanical fan can not be used, so an electric fan is in order. I looked for a thin electric fan and found that you can get one with decent CFM under 3" thick. I wired an electric thermo switch and an extra sensor to warn of possible overheating (220* puts the gauge about 3/4 of the way to the red) - the threads are 3/8" NPT - the 3 hole t-stat housing was sourced from a 7MGTE (turbo) and had the 220* sensor already in it

- I was able to reuse the 22RE P/S pump by moving the reservoir down on the inner fender a bit and having the 7M pulley center bore machined to .710" and hand filing a keyway (7M uses a ribbed belt) - further the 7M A/C bracket needs to be cut up a bit and a simple bracket fabbed up to adapt the pump to the A/C bracket, I also made a nother bracket to brace the pump in an attempt to reduce vibration and bracket flex under belt tension



- for the exhaust I bought 2 tight radius u-bent pieces from Jegs and cut off bits of angle as I needed them to route the exhaust under the Cressida oil pan (with heat shields on top of the pipe to keep heat away from the oil pan) – also try to keep the catalytic converter as close to the engine as possible so it can get hot enough to pass emissions – another option would be to run the exhaust down the passenger side and cross it over under the t-case, there is just enough room to fish the pipe through a hole between the t-case / crossmember / frame rail, this setup would also allow you to mount the cat converter just after the exhaust manifold (while this routing would be easier, I didn’t like it for a couple reasons)



- firewall will need to be clearanced slightly for the EGR valve on the driver side and for the 90* coolant hose on the passenger side (hose barely touches metal if not clearanced)


- relocated battery from passenger to driver side, I used the factory alternator wire to get power from the new battery location to the original fuse box (I later ran an additional 10 ga wire and added a 120 amp manual reset circuit breaker for accident safety)

- the actual wiring of everything is in this link - 7M Wiring - if you are comfortable with a soldering iron and 12V electrical, there’s
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ronnie4Offline
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Location: Colorado Springs, CO
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome Writeup, this will help me out a lot.

What does removing the steering damper do?
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coraxOffline
Joined: 27 May 2005
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Location: eastern PA
Gender: Male
PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ronnie4 wrote:
Awesome Writeup, this will help me out a lot.

What does removing the steering damper do?


The steering dampner mounts on top of the steering linkage and to the right-side frame rail. Using the Cressida oil pan (on IFS) doesn't leave enough room above the linkage for the dampner. An option is to just buy an aftermarket unit that mounts to the linkage with a pair of u-bolts and weld up a simple bracket to the right side frame rail
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ronnie4Offline
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whats the steering damper's function? Am I going to notice any difference in steering with it removed?
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coraxOffline
Joined: 27 May 2005
Total posts: 33
Location: eastern PA
Gender: Male
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ronnie4 wrote:
Whats the steering damper's function? Am I going to notice any difference in steering with it removed?


You won't really notice much difference unless you are running tires bigger than 32"-33"

from the FabTech website: A steering damper, or steering stabilizer, assists the shock absorbers by providing extra absorption. It functions similarly as your shocks because it is hydraulic in nature. With the help of a steering damper, you’ll get reduced steering kickback for a smoother ride.

basically it reduces steering kickback from road irregularities and can help make the steering feel a bit more "stable" - as long as the rest of the suspension is in good shape
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ronnie4Offline
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Age: 32
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your help man,

Now I just need to source a cressida oil pan and pickup.
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coraxOffline
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

best place would be a Pick-A-Part or U-Pull-It type self serve junkyard. They usually move inventory through fairly frequently, with new cars every week or so. I gathered everything I needed for dirt cheap over a half year of searching . . . good exercise too, walking around a junkyard with 30 pounds of tools in a bag on your shoulder

here's one in your area - http://coloradosprings.upullandpay.com/ - there are also a few others in Colorado Springs

try maps.google.com search for "you pull junkyard near colorado springs, CO"
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ronnie4Offline
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds all too familiar man. I usually go to that place at least once a month.
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ronnie4Offline
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone know if the 5M pan is the same as the cressida pan?
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coraxOffline
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 31, 2009 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thought I'd update this thread with my final solution for cooling this swap, it is a bit overkill but hasn't given me any problems to date -

A few months back I found a double row, dual pass Ron Davis radiator at a flea market for $25 (too good of a deal to pass up). Though I wasn't sure if I could use it, a few weeks of staring at it got me going on how to fit it into an already tight engine bay.

(2 of the fins were previously repaired, but they look solid)


Here's how it works. A dual-pass horizontal-flow radiator moves coolant across the top half of the radiator on the first pass, then directs the coolant across the lower portion of the radiator face for a second pass. One reason this works is because the velocity of the coolant roughly doubles when the coolant is forced to travel across half as many tubes per pass. This creates turbulence in the tubes, exposing more coolant to the radiator tube walls and improving heat transfer. It also provides a bit of a restriction to coolant flow, reducing the overall flow rate of the cooling system and allowing the coolant to spend more time in the radiator. I think one of my problems with the single core Griffin was that it flowed too fast with this engine - the coolant didn't have enough time to really cool as it passed through the radiator (but that's just speculation).


I enlarged the radiator opening a bit so I could move the radiator as far forward as possible.

Here it is all mocked up in its final position. I already had the lower brackets made (just a "J-hook" to cradle the bottom of the radiator), so I just needed to bend and fit the brackets to their final position.


The top hose/inlet is a simple 1.5" neck that the hose slides on to. The lower hose/outlet though is a 3/4" NPT bung . . . so I got a copper 3/4" NPT fitting, trimmed the overall length down and soldered a "street elbow" on to it. I also tapped the bung a bit deeper so that the copper fitting would thread all the way in (no threads showing). The outlet on my fitting is now 1.25" - the stock lower radiator hose is 1.375" - so there sohould be no real restriction that I need to worry about.

top view of it mounted with the plumbing all connected - I found a formed hose that I could cut/splice onto the stock lower radiator hose and used a universal flex hose for the top

Home Depot pipe hanger to hold the long lower radiator hose away from anything it might rub against


Previously I was using a 14" fan on my single core Griffin radiator. I could fit one 12" or 2 9" fans with the new setup (not enough room between the radiator and the front cross member for the 14"). I did some math on how much coverage the fans would give on the radiator:
1x14" fan = 153 sq.in.
1x12" fan = 113 sq.in.
2x9" fans = 127 sq.in
So 2x9" fans it is then - combined they pull 22 amps when they first start spinning, but settle down to 10 amps at full speed. Even though I'm stepping down in fan size I should be golden since the overall cooling capacity is increasing - won't find out till I have to pull the trailer again, but I can say that with this radiator that ans don't cycle on nearly as much.

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coraxOffline
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2009 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

After 3.5 years I finally got around to putting a steering stabilizer back on

Here's my bracket for the frame side attachment using 2 driver side front cross member bolts

I borrowed this idea from the universal fit steering stabilizers - 1" exhuast clamps from NAPA work perfect with a piece of 1/8" flat stock between them

ready for install - this stabilizer doesn't have any brand names on it, but I'm pretty sure it's not OEM. I liked how wide the body of it is (compared to the thin OEM ones), so I plucked it out of a mid 90's Limited 4runner

installed and ready for testing on some high speed fireroads - the stock bolts were long enough once I ditched the washers that were on them

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